REVIEWS

Bradley Christensen as the High Priest and Colin Ainsworth as Idomeneo.  Photo: Bruce Zinger

Bradley Christensen as the High Priest and Colin Ainsworth as Idomeneo.
Photo: Bruce Zinger

High priest (IDOMENEO) with Opera Atelier:

"And then there was striking baritone Bradley Christensen as the High Priest and Olivier Lacquerre as Arbace, both lending essential dramatic lower tessitura counterbalance to the opera’s preference for upper register roles. Christensen and Laquerre are excellent singers and actors and I look forward to seeing them in more roles with OA.”
(Stephen Bonfield, Opera Canada, April 10, 2019)

“Bradley Christensen as the High Priest was rock solid.”
(John Gilks, Opera Ramblings, April 7, 2019)

"Finally, the young New Zealand baritone Bradley Christensen showed off his fine voice and imposing stage presence as the High Priest."
(Joseph So, Ludwig-Van Toronto, April 5, 2019)

 
Stephanie DeCiantis as Nedda and Bradley Christensen as Silvio.

Stephanie DeCiantis as Nedda and Bradley Christensen as Silvio.

SILVIO (I Pagliacci) WITH Southern ontario lyric opera:

"Baritone Bradley Christensen (Silvio) was both vocally rich and a good actor, particularly convincing during the Nedda/Silvio duet which DeCiantis and Christensen sang with the lush musical ebb and flow that Leoncavallo’s score demands."
(Dawn Martens, Opera Canada, March 3, 2018)

 
From left to right: Brett Polegato (mentor), Beste Kalendar, David Diston, Brianna de Santis, Clarence Frazer, Valérie Bélanger, Andrey Andreychik, Vania Margani, Bradley Christensen, Jean-Phillippe Lazure, Asitha Tennekoon.  Photo: Joseph So

From left to right: Brett Polegato (mentor), Beste Kalendar, David Diston, Brianna de Santis, Clarence Frazer, Valérie Bélanger, Andrey Andreychik, Vania Margani, Bradley Christensen, Jean-Phillippe Lazure, Asitha Tennekoon.
Photo: Joseph So

REVIEW: SINGING STARS: THE NEXT GENERATION

"New Zealand-Canadian baritone Bradley Christensen contributed Onegin’s aria from act one of Eugene Onegin. His imposing height, handsome stage presence and attractive lyric baritone make him potentially a fine Onegin vocally and dramatically, and he sang it well."
(Joseph So, Opera Canada, November 8, 2017)

 
Bradley Christensen as the Writer.  Photo: Nicola Betts

Bradley Christensen as the Writer.
Photo: Nicola Betts

Tagliaferro (la cecchina) with glen gould opera:

"Most impressive was bass-baritone Bradley Christensen as Tagliaferro and doubling as the Writer."
(Joseph So, Musical Toronto, March 16, 2017)

"Tagliaferro went to Rebanks Fellow Bradley Christensen who played him as an elderly but swaggering cripple. He has a very solid, reliable baritone voice and made the most of the part’s comic potential, especially in the cod martial scene with the Marchese."
(John Gilks, Opera Ramblings, March 16, 2017)

 
From left to right: Emily Kruspe (violin), Barry Shiffman (violin), Bradley Christensen (baritone), Rachel Desoers (cello), Keith Hamm (viola). Photo: Kevin Lloyd

From left to right: Emily Kruspe (violin), Barry Shiffman (violin), Bradley Christensen (baritone), Rachel Desoers (cello), Keith Hamm (viola).
Photo: Kevin Lloyd

canadian opera company concert series

"The final number was Bradley performing Barber’s haunting setting of Matthew Arnold’s sombre Dover Beach.  For this he was joined by Emily Kruspe and Barry Shiffman (violins), Keith Hamm (viola) and Rachel Desoer (cello).  This was classy.  High class string playing coupled with great attention to text.  There’s so much in the words and music in this piece.  It needs a restrained, text first, approach and it got it.  Not perhaps the most cheerful note on which to head back into the snow but a fine conclusion to a well thought out programme."
(John Gilks, Opera Ramblings, January 11, 2017)

 
From left to right: Bradley Christensen (Enrico), Valérie Bélanger (Silvia), Kevin Mallon (Conductor), Maude Brunet (Costanza), Stephen Bell (Gernando), Alaina Viau (Director).

From left to right: Bradley Christensen (Enrico), Valérie Bélanger (Silvia), Kevin Mallon (Conductor), Maude Brunet (Costanza), Stephen Bell (Gernando), Alaina Viau (Director).

Enrico (l’isola disabitata) with thirteen strings:

"As the sidekick Enrico, baritone Bradley Christensen displayed the most well-rounded instrument...focused, rich, and sympathetically communicative."
(Natasha Gauthier, Ottawa Citizen, May 28, 2016)

 

Carmina burana with ottawa Choral society and seventeen voyces:

"I am still reeling from Saturday night's concert, a live soundtrack accompanying the 1925 silent film masterpiece Ben-Hur, which featured the inimitable Kevin Reeves directing the Ottawa Choral Society, Seventeen Voyces, the children's choir of St. Matthew's Church, with soloists Susan Brown, Daniel Taylor and Bradley Christensen, and organist extraordinaire, Matthew Larkin

... The choirs, soloists and percussionists were so compelling, conveying dramatic intensity, an impressive attention to detail and an array of colours with great skill."
(Parv Eshghi, Ottawa Life, March 7, 2016)

 

man with a cornet case (POSTCARD FROM MOROCCO) with univeristy of toronto opera:

Dominick Argento’s 1971 work Postcard from Morocco is unusual.  It’s opera meets Ionesco meets acid rock.  It’s a weird and wonderful kaleidoscope of scenes and music “about” a group of characters who seem to have nothing in common except that they have showed up at a railway station in Morocco c. 1914.

...Musically it’s truly weird.  It can be lyrical, it can be atonal, it includes weirdly distorted Wagner quotations and jazz.  And there’s a drum solo of the floridly pretentious and over long type favoured on prog rock albums in my youth.  One really does wonder what pharmaceutical assistance was involved in the composition.  All of this was brilliantly realized by Dala and his band.

…..

"Bradley Christensen sang Man with a Cornet Case and was truly sinister as A Puppet Maker."
(John Gilks, Opera Ramblings, March 13, 2015)